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Forest High School(OCALA, Fla.) -- A suspect was taken into custody Friday following a shooting at a high school in central Florida, authorities said.

Gunshots broke out Friday morning at Forest High School in Ocala, some 38 miles south of Gainesville.

Within minutes, a school resource officer on campus found a 17-year-old student who had sustained non-life-threatening injuries. The officer also located the suspected shooter, identified as a 19-year-old male who is not a student at the school, according to Marion County Sheriff Billy Woods.

The suspect was taken into custody without incident, and the wounded student was transported to a local hospital for treatment, the sheriff told reporters at a news conference Friday afternoon.

Woods said the shooting appeared to be intentional, but it's unclear whether the suspect was targeting anyone in particular.

Sky Bouche, the suspected shooter, is being cooperative and talking with investigations, the Marion County Woods said in a later press conference Friday afternoon.

As Bouche was escorted out of the Marion County Sheriff's Office Operations Center, he was hounded by questions from reporters.

When one reporter asked if Bouche was "trying to shoot someone," he shook his head.

"I shot through the door," he said. "I didn't see anyone."

Then, when asked by a reporter what he would say to the victim's family, Bouche replied, "Sorry."

"It doesn't make it better, anyway," he said before he was led into a police van.

Woods called the injured victim and the deputy for took Bouche into custody "heroes." When Woods visited the injured student in the hospital, he said he told him, "I am so glad it was me and not one of my friends."

The shooting took place in the school's main building, according to Marion County Public Schools. Approximately 2,200 students attend Forest High School. The students were evacuated and the high school placed on lockdown, along with 17 other schools in the area.

Jonathan Grantham, deputy superintendent of Marion County Public Schools, said there was no indication before the shooting that anything was amiss.

The shooting happened just minutes before thousands of students across the country were set to rally against school gun violence in an event called the National School Walkout. The event is taking place on the anniversary of the massacre at Columbine High School in Colorado, where two students opened fire in 1999, killing 12 classmates and one teacher.

However, one of the student organizers of Friday's walkout said the event is a direct response to the mass shooting in February at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, which left 17 students and educators dead.

"The fact that this keeps on happening ... I knew I needed to do something," Lane Murdock, a sophomore at Ridgefield High School in Connecticut who helped organize the walkout, told ABC News.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) -- NXIVM’s founder and an actress who was a member of his self-help group were indicted Friday on sex trafficking and forced labor conspiracy charges related to what prosecutors say is a secret society within the group.

Keith Raniere, also known as “Vanguard” to members within NXIVM, and Allison Mack, who is best known for her role on the TV series “Smallville,” were both indicted by a grand jury on charges arising from Raniere and Mack’s alleged roles in a secret society within NXIVM. According to the United States Attorney for the Eastern District of New York Richard P. Donoghue, Mack recruited women into what they believed was a “female mentorship group that was, in fact, created and led by Keith Raniere”. Prosecutors say many of the female victims were branded and forced to participate in sex acts with Raniere.

Mack was arrested Friday and will be arraigned Friday before United States Magistrate Judge Cheryl L. Pollak. Raniere was arrested in March on a federal complaint and is currently being held without bond at a detention center in Brooklyn. He is also expected to appear in court on Friday afternoon

According to the U.S. State Attorney's Office, Raniere was deported by Mexican authorities after he was found outside Puerto Vallarta, Mexico in a luxury villa last month. Two days later, he appeared before a judge at a federal courthouse in Fort Worth, Texas.

“As alleged in the complaint, Keith Raniere created a secret society of women whom he had sex with and branded with his initials, coercing them with the threat of releasing their highly personal information and taking their assets,” Donoghue said in a statement released in March.

NXIVM is a secretive self-help organization based in Albany, New York, that was founded by Raniere and Nancy Salzman. It touts itself as a “professional coaching company” and its website says it offers “Executive Success Programs,” or “ESP,” in New York, California, Canada, Mexico and elsewhere.

In a statement posted on the homepage of the group’s website, “In response to the allegations against our founder, Keith Raniere, we are currently working with the authorities to demonstrate his innocence and true character. We strongly believe the justice system will prevail in bringing the truth to light. We are saddened by the reports perpetuated by the media and their apparent disregard for ‘innocent until proven guilty,’ yet we will continue to honor the same principles on which our company was founded. It is during the times of greatest adversity that integrity, humanity and compassion are hardest, and needed most”

ABC News' "20/20" did an extensive report on NXIVM last year, including interviews with several former members, including Sarah Edmondson, who said she was a member of the group for over a decade.

Edmondson told ABC News and said in a complaint to the New York State Department of Health that after attending NXIVM seminars for more than a decade, she was approached about an opportunity to join a secret sorority. Then, one night she said she and five other women were summoned to a house in the Albany area, where they thought they were going to get a tattoo but once there, found out she and the other women were going to be branded.

“It was a horror movie,” she told "20/20." “It was the most inhumane, horrific way to treat anybody. But the most horrific thing is that it’s women doing it to women.”

Edmondson said each of the women would lie down naked and then was branded with a cauterizing device, without any anesthesia. When it was her turn, Edmondson said the pain felt “worse than childbirth.”

As outlined in the Department of Justice press release, the complaint, which was unsealed last month, alleges that “in 2015, Raniere created a secret society within Nxivm called ‘DOS,’ which loosely translated to ‘Lord/Master of the Obedient Female Companions,’ or ‘The Vow.’ DOS operated with levels of women ‘slaves’ headed by ‘masters.’ Slaves were expected to recruit slaves of their own (thus becoming masters themselves), who in turn owed service not only to their own masters but also to masters above them in the DOS pyramid. Raniere stood alone at the top of the pyramid. Other than the (sic) Raniere, all members of DOS were women.”

In a letter Donoghue submitted to the judge in Texas requesting that bail be denied, he asserts that Raniere has had more than 50 DOS slaves under him, many of whom were recruited from within NXIVM’s ranks.

“As alleged, Keith Raniere displayed a disgusting abuse of power in his efforts to denigrate and manipulate women he considered his sex slaves,” FBI’s New York Field Office Assistant Director-in-Charge William F. Sweeney Jr. said in a statement in March. “He allegedly participated in horrifying acts of branding and burning them, with the cooperation of other women operating within this unorthodox pyramid scheme. These serious crimes against humanity are not only shocking, but disconcerting, to say the least, and we are putting an end to this torture today.”

After reports started surfacing about DOS last year, a letter was posted on the NXIVM website, in which Raniere said, "The picture being painted in the media is not how I know our community and friends to be, nor how I experience it myself. However, as an organization and as individuals, we felt it was imperative that we hire experts to ensure there is no merit to the allegations.

"Additionally, I feel it is important to clarify the sorority is not part of NXIVM and that I am not associated with the group," the statement continued. "I firmly support one’s right to freedom of expression, so what the sorority or any other social group chooses to do is not our business so long as there is no abuse. Our experts, a forensic psychiatrist of international repute, psychologists and ex-law enforcement, say members of the sorority are thriving, healthy, happy, better off, and haven’t been coerced. Furthermore, the sorority is proud of what they created and want to share their story. I am confident they will be addressing you very soon."

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Scott Olson/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Some passengers on the Southwest Airlines flight that experienced a deadly engine failure this week told ABC News they received money and the promise of a travel voucher from the airline.

Southwest Flight 1380 experienced engine failure about 20 minutes after takeoff Tuesday from New York City's LaGuardia International Airport en route to Dallas Love Field. A woman who was partially sucked out of a window on the jet near the failed engine later died.

In a letter to passengers obtained by ABC News, the airline offered sincere apologies as well as a $5,000 check and the promise of a $1,000 travel voucher. The letter also states that the airline’s primary focus now is to assist the passengers who were aboard the flight in every way possible.

A Southwest Airlines official confirmed to ABC News that the letters were sent by the airline, but would not comment on the monetary gift.

Obtained by ABC News

“Ours is a company and culture built on relationships," the company said in a statement. "Many of the customers on that flight have flown with us before.”

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating Tuesday's incident. Boeing said it is providing technical help to the investigation, with which Southwest Airlines is cooperating.

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Scott Olson/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Athletes who have accused disgraced gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar's with sexual abuse have filed two new lawsuits Thursday against the International Federation of Gymnastics, as well as USA Gymnastics, the United States Olympic Committee and Michigan State University.

Scores of women and girls, including Olympic gymnasts Aly Raisman, McKayla Maroney and Gabby Douglas have publicly said they were abused by the former USA Gymnastics team physician, who is already behind bars.

Thursday's legal move marks the first lawsuit against the International Federation of Gymnastics, the council that oversees competitive gymnastics on a global scale.

Attorneys allege that USA Gymnastics and others should have acted on allegations of Nassar's alleged abuse sooner, arguing that Nassar could have been stopped years earlier.

"The first report was made in 1997," Mo Aziz, one of the attorneys representing the alleged victims, said at a news conference Thursday.

"These young women were born in 1996, they do not have to be sitting here today," he added. "The hundreds of Mr. Nassar's victims would not have to exist had USAG, had Michigan State University and the other defendants responded appropriately."

Emily Vincent, one of the alleged victims who filed the suit, said in a press conference on Thursday that she was a 15-year-old high school swimmer when she was sexually abused by Nassar.

"How is change going to happen if people don't rally for it?" Vincent said. "This should never happen to anyone in the future and I want to be a part of making that a reality."

Victoria Carlson, another alleged victim, said at the news conference that she did not even identify herself as a victim of the physician's alleged sexual abuse until she read another women's account of her own.

"I never wanted to go public with this," Carlson said Thursday. "I actually never even wanted to tell my parents."

This past February, Nassar, a former Olympic doctor, was sentenced to an additional 40 to 125 years in prison for abusing scores of girls and women in serial sexual assaults that went on for decades. The sentencing came on top of 60 years he received after pleading guilty last December to federal charges of possession of child pornography.

"I just signed your death warrant," Ingham County Circuit Judge Rosemarie Aquilina told Nassar at his sentencing two months ago.

USA Gymnastics told ABC News that it does not comment on pending legal matters.

"USA Gymnastics is sorry that any gymnast was harmed by the despicable crimes Larry Nassar committed," the group said in a statement. "The safety and well-being of our athletes are our highest priority and at the forefront of the decisions and actions that USA Gymnastics is taking to build a culture of empowerment that encourages our athletes to speak up, especially about difficult topics, and promotes a safe, positive training environment."

MSU did not immediately respond to ABC News' request for comment Thursday, but in a statement issued in February following Nassar's sentencing in January said that the sentencing "represents another important step toward justice. Over the past several days, many here at MSU, including President [Lou Anna] Simon and trustees, listened to the brave women who came forward to tell their stories at Nassar’s sentencing hearing."

The statement continued: "Nassar’s behavior was horrific and repugnant, and it is deeply disturbing to know that his crimes were often committed on campus. He will rightfully spend the rest of his life in prison.

"We are committed to continue supporting those in our community affected by these terrible crimes. The Healing Assistance Fund was created to help survivors access any counseling and mental health services they may need. The thoughts and prayers of the entire MSU community are with these women."

Simon later resigned her post as MSU president.

The U.S. Olympic Committee said in a statement: “The many brave survivors and their stories are bringing important changes to sports. The reprehensible behavior of Larry Nassar and other abusers has no place in our Olympic and Paralympic community. Organizations, institutions and individuals alike must reignite a culture for competitive excellence -- one that is a safe, respectful and supportive environment. The USOC has made significant progress to strengthen protections for athletes, and we recognize that our work is never done.”

The International Federation of Gymnastics did not immediately respond to ABC News' request for comment Thursday.

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iStock/Thinkstock(BARSTOW, Calif.) -- A lawyer representing the family of a 26-year-old black man shot and killed in a Walmart parking lot two weeks ago in California is demanding authorities release dashcam video footage to show that the use of force was unwarranted.

Diante Yarber died April 5 after Barstow Police fired at his vehicle, which contained three passengers, all of whom also are believed to be unarmed, more than two dozen times. Authorities said Yarber rammed a police car while accelerating in reverse and then sped toward officers.

"Our initial investigation has revealed that statements police made about Yarber attempting to ram a squad car at the time police shot into his vehicle are not true," Lee Merritt, the family's attorney, told ABC News in a statement. "Video evidence shows the black Ford Mustang Yarber was operating backing slowly away from police when they opened fire.

"We can see no justification for violating policy and procedure, and employing deadly force in a situation where the vehicle presented no immediate danger to law enforcement. Moreover, firing over 30 rounds into a car occupied by four unarmed pedestrians in a crowded Walmart parking lot in the middle of the day was massively irresponsible and reckless."

Police have said that video, shot by a bystander, is from after Yarber rammed the squad car.

According to a statement from Anthony Riley, a public information officer for the Barstom Police Department, the incident began when "officers left their vehicles and commanded the driver to exit his vehicle."

The statement continued, "The suspect/driver began accelerating his vehicle in reverse, striking a police vehicle. The vehicle then accelerated forward towards the officers, and then accelerated in reverse towards officers and striking another patrol vehicle. Afterwards, an officer-involved shooting ensued."

One officer involved suffered nonlife-threatening injuries.

A woman in the car struck by the gunfire was airlifted to Loma Linda Medical Center, according to the statement. The other two men in the car exited the vehicle and were detained by Barstow Police.

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(BARSTOW, Calif.) -- A lawyer representing the family of a 26-year-old black man shot and killed in a Walmart parking lot two weeks ago in California is demanding authorities release dashcam video footage to show that the use of force was unwarranted.

 

Diante Yarber died April 5 after Barstow Police fired at his vehicle, which contained three passengers, all of whom also are believed to be unarmed, more than two dozen times. Authorities said Yarber rammed a police car while accelerating in reverse and then sped toward officers.

 

"Our initial investigation has revealed that statements police made about Yarber attempting to ram a squad car at the time police shot into his vehicle are not true," Lee Merritt, the family's attorney, told ABC News in a statement. "Video evidence shows the black Ford Mustang Yarber was operating backing slowly away from police when they opened fire.

 

"We can see no justification for violating policy and procedure, and employing deadly force in a situation where the vehicle presented no immediate danger to law enforcement. Moreover, firing over 30 rounds into a car occupied by four unarmed pedestrians in a crowded Walmart parking lot in the middle of the day was massively irresponsible and reckless."

 

Police have said that video, shot by a bystander, is from after Yarber rammed the squad car.

 

According to a statement from Anthony Riley, a public information officer for the Barstom Police Department, the incident began when "officers left their vehicles and commanded the driver to exit his vehicle."

 

The statement continued, "The suspect/driver began accelerating his vehicle in reverse, striking a police vehicle. The vehicle then accelerated forward towards the officers, and then accelerated in reverse towards officers and striking another patrol vehicle. Afterwards, an officer-involved shooting ensued."

 

One officer involved suffered nonlife-threatening injuries.

 

A woman in the car struck by the gunfire was airlifted to Loma Linda Medical Center, according to the statement. The other two men in the car exited the vehicle and were detained by Barstow Police.

 

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Support for new gun laws has risen sharply, a new ABC News/Washington Post poll shows, including anti-gun violence legislation in general and a ban on assault weapons in particular.

Large and bipartisan majorities also back raising the legal age to buy long guns and enacting “red-flag” gun-confiscation laws.
 
In the wake of the high school shooting that killed 17 in Parkland, Florida, in February, 62 percent of Americans now support a nationwide ban on the sale of assault weapons, up from 50 percent just since mid-February and 45 percent in late 2015 to its highest since January 2011.

More -- 72 percent -- support raising the legal age to buy rifles and shotguns to 21 in all states, and 85 percent favor red-flag laws empowering the police to take guns away from those judged to be a danger to themselves and others. Such laws have been enacted in six states and proposed in 23 more.

More generally, the public by 57-34 percent now says enacting new laws to try to prevent gun violence should be a higher priority than protecting the right to own a gun. That broad 23-point preference for new gun laws compares with an even 46-47 percent split in fall 2015.
 
These shifts aren’t the norm; attitudes on gun control generally have not moved significantly immediately after heinous gun crimes. Then again, the Parkland shooting prompted an unusual response, including the participation of hundreds of thousands of young people in the March for Our Lives.
 
The public by 71-24 percent also says Congress is not doing enough to try to prevent gun violence, and 59-34 percent says President Donald Trump is not doing enough. As noted in a separate report on Sunday, the issue could be a potent one in November, with 78 percent saying it’s important to them to support candidates who share their views on gun policy.

The changes in views on gun policy come even as many are unsure about the staying power of the student protests that followed the Parkland shooting. Fifty-three percent see this as a lasting movement, while 43 percent think it’s more of a “one-time thing” in the poll, produced for ABC News by Langer Research Associates. That said, another student walkout is planned for Friday, the 19th anniversary of the Columbine shootings; more than 2,000 events nationally have been registered.

Regardless, support for banning assault weapons, raising the age to buy long guns and enacting red-flag laws reach 49, 63 and 81 percent, respectively, even in gun-owning households. That’s a key result because so many American households include a gun owner -- 47 percent in this survey, a numerical high in ABC/Post polls dating back nearly 20 years.
Groups

Women are much more likely than men to support new gun laws, with the greatest growth in those views. In one example, women call passing new laws to reduce gun violence a higher priority than protecting gun rights by almost 3-1, 68-25 percent, while men divide evenly on the question, 46-45 percent. And that priority on new laws is up 16 points among women since 2015 vs. 7 points among men.

Additionally, support for an assault weapons ban has grown twice as much among women as men just since mid-February, up 19 vs. 7 points. That smaller gain among men occurred mostly among nonwhite men -- up from 50 to 63 percent, while remaining essentially unchanged among white men (39 vs. 43 percent).

While there are sharp partisan differences on banning assault weapons, the rise in support crosses party lines. Eighty-two percent of Democrats back the step, up 11 percentage points in two months; it’s 59 percent among independents, up 14 points; and 45 percent among Republicans, up 16 points.

Notable, too, is a big jump in support for banning assault weapons among senior citizens, up 23 points to 77 percent.
 
While the Parkland protests have been organized as a young-persons’ movement, attitudes among young adults are mixed. Most generally, 18- to 29-year-olds are likelier than those 30 and older to favor creating new laws to try to prevent gun violence over protecting gun rights, 65 vs. 56 percent. On specifics, though, young adults are less likely than those age 50 and older to support an assault weapons ban (55 vs. 70 percent, rising to 77 percent among seniors, as noted) or red-flag laws (79 vs. 88 percent). That said, 18 to 29s are more likely than those 50 and older to support making 21 the legal age to buy rifles and shotguns, 84 vs. 69 percent.

Majorities across demographic groups support raising the minimum age for long guns, including 55 percent of Republicans and, as noted, 63 percent of people in gun-owning households. And red-flag laws have even broader bipartisan backing, from 84 percent of Republicans, 83 percent of independents and 92 percent of Democrats.
 
This includes solid support in the conservative base: About three-quarters of 2016 Trump voters (77 percent), evangelical white Protestants (77 percent), strong conservatives (74 percent) and white men without college degrees (74 percent) support red-flag laws.

Criticism of Congress, for its part, extends across party lines, albeit to differing degrees. Most Democrats (87 percent), independents (72 percent) and Republicans (54 percent) say the GOP-controlled Congress isn’t doing enough to try to prevent mass shootings in this country.

Republicans are less critical of Trump’s actions; 63 percent say he is doing enough to try to prevent mass shootings. On this, just 32 percent of independents and 11 percent of Democrats agree.
Methodology

This ABC News/Washington Post poll was conducted by landline and cellular telephone April 8 to April 11, 2018, in English and Spanish, among a random national sample of 1,002 adults. Results have a margin of sampling error of 3.5 points, including the design effect. Partisan divisions are 32-25-35 percent, Democrats-Republicans-independents.

The survey was produced for ABC News by Langer Research Associates of New York, with sampling, data collection and tabulation by Abt Associates of Rockville, Maryland. See details on the survey’s methodology here.

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The attorney for adult-film star Stormy Daniels is vowing to “vehemently argue” against an attempt by President Donald Trump and his personal attorney Michael Cohen to delay her lawsuit challenging the validity of a non-disclosure agreement she signed days before the 2016 presidential election.

 “The American people deserve the truth as quickly as possible,” Daniels’ lawyer Michael Avenatti wrote Thursday on Twitter.

U.S. District Court Judge S. James Otero, who is overseeing Daniels’ lawsuit in federal court, has scheduled a hearing for Friday morning in Los Angeles on Trump and Cohen’s request to put the case on hold for at least 90 days. That request followed last week’s FBI raids on Cohen’s New York office and residences, which raised the specter of possible criminal charges against the President’s longtime lawyer and confidant.

If Judge Otero were to grant the defendants’ request, Daniels’ lawsuit – and Avenatti’s efforts to depose Cohen and Trump under oath - could be frozen for months while the criminal investigation is ongoing.

“The court in the civil case has the discretion to order a stay – which is basically calling a ‘time-out’ in the case,” said Darren Kavinoky, a Los Angeles criminal defense attorney and legal analyst. “This is done with some regularity.”

Federal agents conducting the April 9 searches related to Cohen’s business dealings seized about ten boxes of documents, plus electronic files on multiple phones and electronic devices, according to court records. Among the items reportedly sought were records associated with Cohen’s $130,000 payment to Daniels, which was routed through a Delaware shell company Cohen set up to facilitate the transaction.

The Wall Street Journal first reported the previously secret agreement in January, and government watchdog groups have since urged the Justice Department and the Federal Election Commission to investigate, alleging possible violations of campaign finance laws. Cohen has not been charged with any crime and contends that the payment to Daniels was legal.

The raids came four days after Trump made his first public comments about Daniels’ allegations, denying any knowledge of the payment and referring other questions to Cohen.

"You'll have to ask Michael Cohen," Trump told reporters aboard Air Force One earlier this month. "Michael is my attorney. You'll have to ask Michael."

Through his representatives, the president has repeatedly denied Daniels’ allegations of a sexual encounter with Trump during a Lake Tahoe golf tournament in 2006.

Lawyers for Trump and Cohen argued in court filings that there is “substantial overlap” between Daniels’ lawsuit and the criminal investigation and contended that Cohen’s Fifth Amendment rights against self-incrimination could be implicated if the civil case is allowed to proceed.

“Mr. Cohen is a key witness in this action and Defendants’ most knowledgeable person with respect to the facts,” asserts his attorney Brent Blakely, noting that Cohen negotiated the settlement agreement with Daniels’ previous lawyer and arranged for the payment.

“Thus, if the case moves forward,” Blakely writes, “Defendants’ key witness would have to choose between exercising his Fifth Amendment rights, and testifying on Defendants’ behalf.”

Avenatti countered in court filings that “Cohen has failed to meet his evidentiary burden to show his testimony would be self-incriminating” and argues that Cohen has waived his Fifth Amendment rights because he has “already freely and openly discussed this matter in the public.”

That could pose a problem for Cohen, Kavinoky said, because “once someone has let the proverbial cat out of the bag, it’s far tougher to assert their Fifth Amendment right to silence.”

The hearing Friday will be the first in a case that has dominated headlines for weeks, ever since Daniels filed suit in California seeking to invalidate the deal. Her interview with CBS News’ 60 Minutes in late March drew more than 22 million viewers.

In court filings, attorneys for Cohen have asserted that Daniels could be on the hook for at least $20 million in damages for her alleged breaches of the nondisclosure agreement. In her lawsuit, Daniels claimed that the hush agreement is invalid because Trump — under the alias “David Dennison” — never signed the contract.

The judge’s decision will be “a close call,” Stanley Goldman, a professor of criminal procedure at Loyola Law School, told ABC News.

“Civil cases get deferred all the time if there’s a criminal case,” Goldman said. “A lot of civil cases are tried when a criminal case could have been filed, but wasn’t. If I were the judge I would let the proceedings go forward for the moment, but demand everyone come back if circumstances change, like if there’s an indictment.”

Dana Cole, a Los Angeles criminal defense attorney, told ABC News he thinks Cohen and Trump have a good shot at winning at least a brief delay “until the dust settles and the parties can determine whether the criminal investigation directly relates to the civil case.”

“The Fifth Amendment privilege not to testify is paramount, it is one of the key civil rights we have,” Cole said. He believes the potential criminal exposure Cohen faces will persuade the judge “to let things cool down and get more clarity on what the criminal investigation is focused on.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Students across the country walked out of class Friday morning to rally against school gun violence -- an event the teenage organizers hope will empower young people to continue their momentum in a push for common-sense gun reform.

Friday's National School Walkout coincides with the anniversary of the massacre at Columbine High School in Colorado, where two students opened fire in 1999, killing 12 of their fellow students and a teacher.

More than 2,000 walkout events are scheduled throughout the country, with at least one in every state and several globally, according to organizers, who are students at Ridgefield High School in Connecticut.

The walkouts begin at 10 a.m. in each local time zone with 13 seconds of silence to honor the 13 people killed at Columbine High School.

But this event differs in one major way from last month's nationwide school walkout, which was held on March 14, one month after the shooting at Florida's Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

The March 14 walkout took place for 17 minutes to mark the 17 lives lost. After that time, many students returned to class.

But today's walkout lasts until the end of the school day.

"This is a problem that needs to be addressed longer than 17 minutes," student organizer Lane Murdock, 16, explained to ABC News. "As a student who can't vote, you don't have a lot of power. But what you have that's powerful is your voice, your thoughts, but also your attendance. And leaving for longer than 17 minutes, leaving and breaking up that schedule that all American students have every day is how you get people to pay attention."

Lane and her classmates hope this walkout will continue the momentum in the youth-led fight for common sense gun reform, like bump stock bans and universal background checks. They also want the event to empower students across the country and increase the turnout of young voters at the November midterm elections.

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Mark Makela/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- In the roughest day yet for Bill Cosby’s defense team, a so-called toxicology expert acknowledged on the stand on Thursday that he had Googled data for his expert report, that his sole active license was a driver’s license and that one of the scholarly publications he listed on his curriculum vitae was in fact a letter to the editor.

 At one point during an exacting cross-examination, Maryland toxicologist Dr. Harry Milman suggested to a prosecutor probing his credentials that he distribute copies of Milman’s two fiction thrillers to jurors in the stately Pennsylvania courtroom.

“Maybe you’d like to pass them out to the jury,” Milman told Stewart Ryan, an assistant district attorney for Montgomery County, where the world-famous comedian has an estate in a suburb outside of Philadelphia.

Cosby is charged with three counts of aggravated indecent assault, for allegedly drugging and molesting Andrea Constand at his estate in 2004. If convicted, he faces up to 10 years in prison on each count. He has pleaded not guilty.

Cosby has adamantly denied ever drugging or sexually assaulting anyone ever, though dozens of women have come forward publicly to say they believe he knocked them out and sexually assaulted them.

Five of those women took the stand last week to tell notably similar accounts to Constand’s story. All but Constand’s allegations fall outside the statute of limitations for criminal prosecution. A number of the women are suing the entertainer in civil court.

A previous trial last summer ended in a hung jury and a mistrial. This time around, Cosby has a whole new defense team employing a more aggressive strategy than the previous team to save the Philadelphia native from a prison cell.

With defense attorneys spinning in their chairs every few minutes to see the clock on the back wall without having to look at their watches in front of a jury, Milman conceded during a particularly thorny patch of cross-examination that a key figure he’d quoted under direct examination about the effect of sedatives on the central nervous system came from a web search.

Milman testified in his report and on the stand that only about 1 to 10 percent of people experience the side effects of diphenhydramine, the active ingredient in Benadryl.

Ryan, holding a copy of a peer-reviewed medical compendium that put the common side effects figure at about 50 percent, moved in.

“What was the source of the information?” he asked Milman.

“I went online,” the witness replied, “which is a common thing to do these days.”

“Did you Google it?” Ryan asked.

“Yes,” the toxicologist replied, after a pause.

Cosby told Constand’s mother in a phone call after the alleged assault that he had merely given her daughter Benadryl, an over-the-counter antihistamine used to treat allergies and colds that also has sedative effects on some users.

Prosecutors suspect but cannot prove that Cosby actually gave the former professional women’s basketball player something stronger.

In both trials, prosecutors have been permitted to read into evidence portions of Cosby’s sworn testimony during a deposition in a civil lawsuit Constand brought against him and that he settled in 2006 for $3.38 million.

In the deposition, he said he carried prescription Quaaludes around in the 1970s to share what were referred to in court testimony as “disco biscuits” to potential sex partners with their consent. He said he did so with at least one young woman at the time, prior to sex.

No evidence has been presented at trial that Cosby gave Constand Quaaludes.

But Constand’s mother testified that after telling her he gave her daughter Benadryl, he cryptically promised to get the name of the drug on his “prescription" and mail it to her, though he said he never did.

The toxicologists were on hand to sort out the science, but much of the day was consumed with the colorful defense expert’s testimony.

When it seemed like every jaw in the courtroom had hit the floor, Milman acknowledged that under the criteria he was using, a Viagra-fueled rape would be categorized as a drug-induced sexual assault -- the felony with which Cosby is charged.

Still, the doctor seemed to pivot quickly, glancing sidelong at a box of wide-eyed jurors to confide that the man’s “defense was, if you will, the Viagra made me do it!”

At another point, Ryan quizzed Milman on his credentials and asked if in fact one of the scholarly articles on his CV was actually “a reply to a letter to the editor?” Milman conceded the point.

 In an unusual arrangement sanctioned by the judge aiming to keep the case moving in deference to a sequestered jury, the prosecution closed their case on Wednesday but re-opened it on Thursday to call a final expert witness who wasn’t available until today.

That set the stage for dueling toxicologist testimony. Ultimately the two differed on one key point.

Dr. Timothy Rohrig, the prosecution expert, testified that it takes about 10 to 15 minutes for the sedative effects of Benadryl to take hold -- which is consistent with Constand’s account of being drugged and molested by the entertainer at his Elkins Park estate in early 2004.

Milman, the defense expert, countered that it takes about an hour, which is inconsistent with Constand’s account of seeing double, getting dizzy and passing out within several minutes of taking pills she testified given to her by Cosby and sipping wine.

Rohrig testified for less than half an hour, while Milman’s testimony crossed the four-hour mark late Thursday afternoon before grinding to a close around 6 p.m.

Milman, a friendly, veteran toxicologist, spent time as a pioneering pharmacist on an American Indian reservation, and nearly two decades at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Unlike Rohrig, however, he is not a forensic toxicologist, having let his medical license lapse after retiring.

Asked whether he holds any active licenses, he replied with a straight face that “I hold a driver’s license.”

Defense testimony continues on Friday.

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ABCNews.com(NEW YORK) -- Three Tennessee Air National Guardsmen have been disciplined after a video surfaced appearing to show a master sergeant miming her oath of reenlistment with a dinosaur puppet on her raised right hand.

"I am absolutely embarrassed that a senior officer and a senior [noncommissioned officer] took such liberties with a time-honored military tradition," said Maj. Gen. Terry M. Haston, adjutant general of the Tennessee National Guard, in a statement Wednesday.

"Not taking this oath solemnly and with the utmost respect is firmly against the traditions and sanctity of our military family and will not be tolerated," Haston added.

According to the statement, the colonel who administered the oath was demoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel and "immediately retired," and the senior NCO holding the puppet was removed from her position with the Tennessee Joint Public Affairs Office, with "other administrative actions are underway."

The senior NCO who recorded the video was officially reprimanded and removed from his billet as unit first sergeant but will stay with the Tennessee Air National Guard.

According to an Air Force guide for protocol, though a reenlistment ceremony "may be conducted in any place that lends dignity to the event," both the reenlistee and reenlisting officer "must wear an authorized uniform for the ceremony."

While use of a puppet may be abnormal, unorthodox reenlistment ceremonies are not unheard of, with military members taking their oaths while being exposed to CS gas, suspended on a rappelling tower, or even in military planes before jumping out and parachuting to earth.

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South Padre Island PD(NEW YORK) -- The woman wanted in an alleged multistate crime spree has been apprehended in Texas, near the U.S.-Mexico border.

Lois Riess, 56, was wanted for allegedly fatally shooting her husband in Minnesota and then killing and stealing the identity of 59-year-old Pamela Hutchinson in Florida.

Two deputies with the U.S. Marshals service arrested Riess around 8:30 p.m. local time Thursday on South Padre Island, John Kinsey, a U.S. Marshals spokesman, told ABC News.

Kinsey said Riess was sitting at a restaurant by herself when the deputies arrested her.

The case began last month in Blooming Prairie, Minnesota. David Reiss, 54, hadn't been seen in more than two weeks as of March 23, the Dodge County Sheriff’s Office in Minnesota said, and his business partner requested that authorities go to his home.

There, officers found David Riess' body. He had been shot multiple times, the sheriff's office said.

It was unclear how long he had been dead, and his wife, Lois Riess, was missing, the sheriff's office said.

After Lois Riess allegedly killed her husband in Minnesota, she allegedly stole his money and then drove to Fort Myers Beach, Florida, authorities said. There, Lois Riess met Hutchinson and then allegedly killed her and stole her ID, credit cards and car, said the Lee County, Florida, Sheriff's Office.

Officials had feared Lois Riess would continue targeting women who look like her.

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iStock/Thinkstock(TRENTON, Fla.) -- Two sheriff's deputies were shot and killed in the line of duty inside a Florida restaurant on Thursday afternoon, according to law enforcement officials.

Two deputies from the Gilchrist County Sheriff's Office were fatally shot at about 3 p.m. ET while they were at the Ace China restaurant in downtown Trenton, some 50 miles west of Gainesville, according to a statement from Gilchrist County Sheriff Bobby Schultz.

A gunman walked into the restaurant and opened fire at the deputies, officials said. Authorities initially thought the gunman had fired at the deputies through a window, but they later determined that the bullet holes in the glass were exit holes.

Deputies responding to the scene found the suspected shooter dead from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound inside his car, officials said. The suspect was later identified as 59-year-old John Hubert Highnote of Bell, a town in Gilchrist County.

The two deputies -- identified as 30-year-old Sgt. Noel Ramirez and 25-year-old Deputy Taylor Lindsey -- died from their injuries, according to the sheriff.

Ramirez, a seven-year veteran of the force, is survived by a wife and children. Lindsey, who'd been on the force for three years, was not married but had a girlfriend.

Schultz described Ramirez and Lindsay as "the best of the best."

"They are men with integrity. They are men of loyalty," he said. "They're God-fearing, and they loved what they did, and we're very proud of them."

Investigators have not determined a motive or "indications as to why this tragedy occurred," according to the sheriff, who was on the scene throughout the afternoon and notified the deputies' loved ones.

"I do not have answers as to why this happened," Schultz said, calling the gunman a "coward."

"The world is full of cowards, and the world's full of heroes," he said. "We need to highlight those heroes and what they gave."

Schultz suggested that the deputies may have been killed because law enforcement has been "demonized."

"The only thing these men were guilty of was wanting to protect you and me," he said. "They just wanted to get something to eat, and they just wanted to do their jobs."

Schultz described Ramirez as having an "infectious smile" and said Lindsay was planning to participate in the first responder Olympics.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott said he is "heartbroken" at the loss of the deputies.

"It is true evil for anyone to hurt a law enforcement officer, and in Florida, we have zero tolerance for violence, especially against the police," Scott said in a statement. "Tonight, I ask every Floridian to honor these law enforcement officers, their brothers and sisters in uniform and their families. May God bless those who work to keep our communities safe."

Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi said in a statement that the Gilchrist County Sheriff's deputies were "senselessly killed."

"The daily risk that law enforcement officers take to protect our communities is overwhelming," Bondi said. "My deepest condolences and prayers are with their families as they mourn the devastating loss of their loved ones. May their families, friends and fellow officers find peace and comfort during this very difficult time."

The sheriff's office tweeted that it suffered a "terrible tragedy" and asked residents to avoid the area where the deputies were killed.

Law enforcement officials from neighboring countries, as well as the Florida Department of Law Enforcement and the state attorney's office are assisting in the ongoing investigation, Schultz said.

Further details on the shooting were not immediately available and will be released by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, Schultz said.

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iStock/Thinkstock(PARRISH, Ala.) -- A train full of "sewage sludge" from the New York City area has left a small Alabama town after sitting on the tracks for more than two months.

Residents of Parrish, Alabama, have complained about the smell, an infestation of flies, and concerns about declining property values since the waste has been sitting on the tracks, according to Alabama.com.

The company that delivers the waste to Alabama received a permit from the state in December 2016 to dispose of biosolids, also called "sewer sludge," from wastewater treatment plants in New York and New Jersey, according to local news reports. Since then, local communities and towns along the route to deliver the waste to the landfill filed complaints and lawsuits to keep the waste and the smell out of their towns, which left the train cars stuck outside Parrish for months while the issue was resolved.

Parrish is about 40 miles northwest of Birmingham and has a population of fewer than 1,000 people.

Parrish Mayor Heather Hall posted on Facebook that the last container was removed from the town on Tuesday afternoon. She wrote that the situation was unprecedented and there was no entity regulating the situation. She added that it took more than two months and state senators getting involved to resolve the issue.

"I will say this over and over... this material does not need to be in a populated area... period. It greatly diminishes the quality of life for those who live anywhere near it," she wrote in the Facebook post.

New York City has stopped using the facility in Alabama because of local concern, a spokesman for the New York City Department of Environmental Protection told Alabama.com. The department did not respond to ABC News' request for comment.

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ABC News (NEW YORK) -- Western Oklahoma wildfire conditions remain critical, despite unrelenting efforts to contain.

Fire danger remains high to very high, with flames reaching up to 70 feet, the Oklahoma Forestry Services reports. The Rhea Fire in Dewey County continues to be the most active, having burned over 283,000 acres in a week span.

The combination of strong winds and dry vegetation, particularly the eastern red cedar trees, have caused the fires to burn faster than usual, Oklahoma Forestry Services told ABC News. The oil of the cedar trees also increases flammability.

With a lack of rainfall in Oklahoma for over 150 days, dry terrain creates an environment for rapid consumption.

In total, more than 350,000 acres have burned, and though evacuation centers have closed, additional fires remain active in Woodward County, Beaver/Harper County, and Texas County.

The fires continue to be more critical in the western region.

The fires are currently not expected to move as quickly as the wind has gone down and the humidity has increased, Oklahoma Forestry Services said.

A burn ban remains in effect for 36 counties in western-central Oklahoma due to the fire danger. The fires have killed two people thus far, but with the chance of precipitation ahead, firefighters remain hopeful.

Oklahoma Forestry Services encourages the public to assess their property’s vulnerability to approaching wildfires by visiting www.firewiseusa.org.

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WABC(NEW YORK) -- Police officers have to be prepared for anything but Det. Mark Rubins did not anticipate putting his training to the test during this week’s New York Police Academy graduation ceremony.

With recruits gathered at Madison Square Garden Wednesday, Rubins heard a commotion from the family of one of the graduates, Officer Leonardo Escorcia, because his 1-year-old son had started choking.

Rubins, who is also a paramedic, and Lt. Greg Besson rushed to the child.

“It was just, grab the kid and kind of do anything you could at that point,” Rubins told ABC News. “You saw him limp, you knew as you were going up the stairs what the game plan was. You just kind of go with your training and it kicks in.”

Rubins said he was running on adrenaline in the seconds it took him to reach the child, grab the boy and clear his airway by patting the child’s back, successfully dislodging what turned out to be popcorn stuck in his throat. The whole ordeal lasted less than two minutes.

“I'm just happy that he was in good hands when this happens and that Det. Rubins was there,” Escorcia said. “He just jumped into action.”

Officer Escorcia’s wife, Lillian, said she now plans to take CPR classes, something Rubins said every parent should do.

"Everyone should be learning CPR. It can happen anywhere, any time. It's certainly something that anyone who's going to be around children should take, especially for choking hazards. People should learn from that,” Rubins said.

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